THE STORY OF SEIJI TAKAMORI
Seiji Takamori was born in Japan around 1907. He was ordained as a Zen monk when he was 19. He received his training in a remote monastery under a Zen monk named Takeuchi.

During his time at the monastery, Seiji saw his teacher perform healing using his hands on villagers. This method was called Reiki. He implored Takeuchi to teach him the art of healing.
Takeuchi had learned this method from a man called Hayashi, a Reiki Master, and so Takeuchi agreed for Seiji to become his pupil and passed on his skills as a Reiki Master.

Seiji was given attunements and asked to work on himself. Then he was taught how to treat another person in a seated position focusing on the chakras.
His proficiency was frequently tested by Takeuchi. When he reached a further stage in his development, further attunements were given and after a lengthy training he became a Reiki Master.

One of the gifts of this training was a special mediation that had been passed on by Mikao Usui to Hayashi, and from Hayashi to Takeuchi. It was called Buddho meditation, and Seiji was told that Mikao Usui had practised this technique during his retreat on Mount Kurama where he received his empowerment. It was extremely powerful.

Seiji began to feel that there was more to Reiki than his teacher knew. Increasingly he was convinced of the presence of some hidden truth and set out to find it. He felt in his heart that this meditation was connected to Reiki. He began to seek for another teacher who could help him in his path to enlightenment and so he prepared for the longest journey of his life.
He travelled first to India where he lived in temples and ashrams, studied sanskrit, Pal and Hindi, as well as Tibetan. After many years of travelling and studying he finally met a lineage of monks who recognised the Buddho meditation symbols as well as some of the Reiki symbols as being part of their ancient healing system. Seiji Takamori studied with a senior monk here for many years.

The original Buddho method of healing that had been brought by a few lamas to this remote Himalayan region from Tibet had evolved into a highly developed system of healing and meditation.

After many years it became clear that Seiji's goal was to develop the healing method he had learnt and give assistance and teaching to whoever needed it. Therefore he finally left the monks to share the knowledge around the world.

Later in life, after some years spent in the United States, Seiji travelled again to Asia studying Theravada Buddhism and Vipassana meditation in Thailand and Burma.


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